P-51 Mustang Demo

The Atlanta Air Show will feature a P-51 Mustang Demo showcasing the incredible maneuverability and that unmistakable sound that made this World War II era fighter the legend of it’s time.  Even today, the P-51 Mustang is an air show favorite.   The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber... View Article


The Atlanta Air Show will feature a P-51 Mustang Demo showcasing the incredible maneuverability and that unmistakable sound that made this World War II era fighter the legend of it’s time.  Even today, the P-51 Mustang is an air show favorite.

 

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang was an American long-range, single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber used during World War II, the Korean War and other conflicts. The Mustang was conceived, designed and built by North American Aviation. The prototype NA-73X airframe was rolled out on September 9, 1940 and first flew on October 26, 1940. The Mustang was originally designed to use the Allison V-1710 engine, which had limited high-altitude performance. It was first flown by the Royal Air Force as a tactical-reconnaissance aircraft and fighter-bomber. The addition of the Rolls-Royce Merlin to the P-51B/C model transformed the Mustang’s performance at altitudes above 15,000 ft, matching or exceeding that of the German fighters.

 

The P-51 Mustang Demo at the Atlanta Air Show will be a P-51D, powered by the Packard V-1650-7 two-stage two-speed supercharged engine. During it’s time in service to the military it was armed with six .50 caliber M2 Browning machine guns.

 

From late 1943, P-51s were used by the USAAF’s Eighth Air Force to escort bombers in raids over Germany, a role in which the Mustang helped ensure Allied air superiority in 1944. The P-51 was also in service with Allied air forces in the North African, Mediterranean and Italian theaters, and saw limited service against the Japanese in the Pacific War. During World War II, Mustang pilots shot down nearly 5,000 enemy aircraft.

 

At the start of the Korean War, the Mustang was the main fighter of the United Nations until jet fighters such as the F-86 took over this role; the Mustang then became a specialized fighter-bomber. Despite the advent of jet fighters, the Mustang remained in service with some air forces until the early 1980s.

 

After World War II and the Korean War, many Mustangs were converted for civilian use, especially air racing, and increasingly, preserved and flown as historic warbird aircraft at air shows like the Atlanta Air Show.

 

 

 


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